From Muriel Mirak-Weissbach

Muriel Mirak-Weissbach

Muriel Mirak-Weissbach is the daughter of Artemis and John Mirak, who both survived the genocide as orphans. A graduate of Wellesley College, she went to Italy on a Fulbright scholarship, and earned a graduate degree from the State University of Milan, where she then taught English literature. In 1980, she left academic life for political journalism, and focused on political, economic and cultural developments in the Arab and Islamic world, visiting many countries of the region, including Jordan, Egypt, Iraq, Sudan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Malaysia, Yemen and the Islamic Republic of Iran. Following the 1991 war against Iraq, she and her German husband led a humanitarian aid effort (the Committee to Save the Children in Iraq), in collaboration with leading political figures in Iraq, Jordan, Palestine and the United Nations over the subsequent ten years.

BERLIN — Fourteen years have passed since Hrant Dink was assassinated in front of the offices of Agos newspaper in Istanbul. Since then, conditions for journalists, intellectuals and pro-democracy activists inside Turkey have worsened[...]

YEREVAN — One can always find reason to celebrate. No matter how difficult the last year was for Armenians, with the suffering caused by the COVID pandemic and the Artsakh war, Christmas brought with it a spirit of hope for a better[...]

On December 19, six choirs from Armenia and Artsakh joined seven other choirs to perform on World Choral Day (http://worldchoralday.org/). This event, organized every December under the auspices of the International Federation of Choral[...]

BERLIN — On November 25, the French Senate voted almost unanimously to recognize Artsakh, as reported in the Mirror-Spectator. The following day, the Central Council of Armenians in Germany (ZAD) issued a press release, thanking the[...]

It was Winston Churchill who made Armenian brandy famous. When Stalin introduced him to it at Yalta, he was immediately hooked. One story has it that, when asked to explain how he had managed to stay so healthy at an advanced age, he[...]

BERLIN — Walking up towards the Brandenburg Gate, you see on the ground a myriad of small red votive candles, lined up in rows to form a huge cross. Behind it, on a stage, an orchestra plays a piece by Komitas. It is November 6 in[...]

BERLIN — As the war in the South Caucasus enters its second month, Armenian organizations in Germany are redoubling their efforts to urge government authorities in Berlin and in Europe to finally take effective action. The Central[...]

BERLIN — Since the renewed outbreak of war in Nagorno-Karabakh, efforts have been underway on an international level to stop the fighting, and lay the basis for a political solution. The central institution involved has been the Minsk[...]

BERLIN — At the Luisenkirchhof cemetery in Berlin-Charlottenburg, large, imposing structures stand in solemn commemoration of genocide victims. These are the Altars of Remembrance, dedicated to the memory of the more than 3 million[...]

POTSDAM, Germany — On September 18 the Lepsiushaus in Potsdam hosted a book launch of the volume, Todesvision. Eine Hommage an die ermordeten Dichter Armeniens (1915-1945) (Vision of Death. Homage to Armenia’s Murdered Poets[...]

BERLIN — When Azerbaijan attacked the Tavush region in July, Armenians everywhere responded with protest demonstrations. In Berlin, as reported in this newspaper, several cultural associations came together to organize an artistic[...]