From Muriel Mirak-Weissbach

Muriel Mirak-Weissbach

Muriel Mirak-Weissbach is the daughter of Artemis and John Mirak, who both survived the genocide as orphans. A graduate of Wellesley College, she went to Italy on a Fulbright scholarship, and earned a graduate degree from the State University of Milan, where she then taught English literature. In 1980, she left academic life for political journalism, and focused on political, economic and cultural developments in the Arab and Islamic world, visiting many countries of the region, including Jordan, Egypt, Iraq, Sudan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Malaysia, Yemen and the Islamic Republic of Iran. Following the 1991 war against Iraq, she and her German husband led a humanitarian aid effort (the Committee to Save the Children in Iraq), in collaboration with leading political figures in Iraq, Jordan, Palestine and the United Nations over the subsequent ten years.

HALLE, Germany — The cathedral in Halle is huge, but once the doors closed and visitors had taken their seats, it was almost full — at least as full as it could be under pandemic conditions of social distancing. In mid-afternoon on[...]

BRUSSELS — Four young musicians from Brussels have just concluded a concert tour of Armenia, bringing the healing power of music to layers of the population still suffering the impact of war and pandemic disease. The Akhtamar Quartet[...]

BERLIN — In 1988, after massive earthquakes struck Armenia, leaving behind a trail of death, injuries, crumbled buildings and shattered lives. “That December,” Ambassador Ashot Smbatyan would later recall, “many came to our aid,[...]

BERLIN — Can we learn from history? Has the vow of “Never again!” found fulfillment? Or has one historic catastrophe merely paved the way for an even more tragic repetition? These crucial questions are at the center of an ambitious[...]

BERLIN — What does it mean to be Armenian? What is Armenia’s national identity? How do its citizens perceive it? And those in the diaspora? Over the last 30 years, the country and its people have experienced political upheaval through[...]

ARLINGTON, Mass. — “I welcome you to this special event dedicated to the 110th anniversary of the birth of Alan Hovhaness, one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.” This is how Dr. Ara Ghazarians, curator of the Armenian[...]

YEREVAN — April had started with rain in Yerevan, one wet day after another, and the organizers of the My Way Center prayed for sunshine. On April 6, the day they had chosen for the event, board member Sona Petrosyan, looked up at the[...]

BOCHUM, Germany — Under normal circumstances we would have organized a huge birthday party. There would have been music —  Armenian music — and poetry and dancing, shish-kebab, with all the trimmings, paklava and Ararat cognac.[...]

GEGHANIST, Armenia — “It seems that our dreams have come true!” This is how Alya Kirakosyan put it when the ceramics lab opened this month. Kirakosyan is the director of Warm Hearth, a house in the village of Geghanist in Ararat[...]

It was in the middle of October, not long after the outbreak of the war in Nagorno-Karabakh. Amalia Safaryan, a young pianist living in Marburg, called her friend, Seda Nahapetyan, a singer in Giessen. Her message was urgent: “We have to[...]

YEREVAN — Every message I have received from Armenia over the holidays has expressed the notion that 2020 was a terrible year for everyone, and doubly so for Armenia. Not only has the pandemic brought sickness and death to many[...]